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Book Club No.14



Hey folks, welcome back to Book Club: a chance to delve into some of the works I've been indulging in lately and whether or not I rate or slate them. This instalment has a real mixed bag but in the best possible way and what's even better is I *actually* enjoyed all three books I'm going to mention today! Whether you're fan of drama, poetry, or murder, I've got you covered in this latest Book Club.

Zodiac by Sam Wilson
Zodiac is my most recently finished book and it was certainly a pleasant surprise to read. I picked it up on a relatively recent trip to The Works (which, if you live in the UK, can be an absolute gem for finding unusual and popular titles in the 3 for £5 section!) and I'm so glad I did. The cover and the general *crime thriller vibes* are what initially drew me in. The title and wee blurb gave me a little bit of insight that astrology and starsigns might play a part in the drama that unfolds so of course, that had me hook line and sinker as I'm partial to a bit of the ol' horoscopes as it is.

The story essentially follows a Detective Burton and his astrological helper, Lindi Childs, as they try to work out why some high-profile individuals are being murdered and try to uncover what their connection is. Zodiac takes place generally in a place called San Celeste and it has an LA sort of feel to it as you read delve further into the story. The interesting thing about San Celeste and the world of Zodiac in general is the fact that society is dictated by zodiac/star signs. For example, if you're a Capricorn, chances are you're a hot-shot CEO of some company and have millions of dollars invested in yourself as a brand and individual and many businesses whereas if you're an Aries, you probably live in the shithole aptly named Ariesville and have turned to life of drink, drugs, crime, or all three just to get by. I'm a big believer in our starsigns and birth dates having a lot to do with our personalities and general traits so it was a nice read for me to get into that interest via another interest of mine (i.e. crime thriller genre fiction). Burton and Childs basically discover that the murders of these high-profile men are linked to their elemental signs - Earth, Air, Fire, Water - and they need to predict who is going to be next based on this. Of course, as they investigate, they uncover more information about different things and individuals in San Celeste that opens more problems for them and the police.

The narrative of Zodiac reminds me a lot of the kind of classic Dan Brown style in that the chapters tend to jump from Burton and his story to another character called Daniel and his story/interactions. It also switches between many other characters but it's easy to follow and with each page you learn more about how they are all interlinked. One thing I particularly liked about this writing style is that there is a bit of a plot twist in terms of the timeline that I did not piece together. I don't know if it was obvious and I just didn't pick up on it, but I think it was cleverly executed either way and I honestly believe that if I even knew the "twist" from the get-go, it wouldn't have dulled the enjoyment of it at all. The characters are all very interesting and fit within the stereotypes of each of their starsigns which helps make the societal divide more believable too. The one criticism (and I say that loosely) with this book is that I feel like the whole story had a great pace to it but then was over in a flash at the end. The whole book works up to a grand finale, but I definitely could have done with a few more chapters just to fully tie everything together and finish the whole story on a cleaner break. With that being said, I did really enjoy it and was also *so* pleased to see there was no random love interest scenario plopped in there like many crime thrillers do - so thank you Wilson for not being a shitty predictable writer! Pick up a copy of Zodiac in a variety of formats, here.



The Sun and Her Flowers by Rupi Kaur
One of my all-time favourite books is Milk & Honey by Rupi Kaur as it was the first poetry book I read as an adult that made me fall in love with poetry instead of loathing it due to what I was forced to read in school. Kaur's writing is incredibly relatable for so many people who read her work and I certainly include myself in that group. The Sun and Her Flowers is Kaur's second publication and has more of an "after the heartbreak" feel to it compared to Milk & Honey.

The Sun and Her Flowers starts with poetry covering relationship breakdown and realisations made in the grief afterwards. It then progresses into finding yourself, accepting flaws, and trying to practice self love. Kaur also explores how self love can then help you find the love you deserve elsewhere. I once again found myself reading every poem and finding comfort in Kaur's words and finding it consolable in aspects of my own life. My emotions can swing from feeling empowered by her words to feeling incredibly upset and needing to purge that upset but that's my favourite thing about it. An additional theme in The Sun and Her Flowers that I feel Kaur explored much more in this book compared to Milk & Honey is her ancestry and family. She writes such wonderfully honest and pure words about her mother and also writes about what it's like being the first generation to be born and live in a different country. There's passion running throughout every poem and it's incredibly infectious. Although I feel The Sun and Her Flowers is fantastic in its own right, I can't help but do what many others have done and compare it to Milk & Honey. I still prefer Milk & Honey over this book, but I still recommend reading this because Kaur has certainly managed to maintain her emotional rollercoaster effect. Pick up a copy here.



Holding by Graham Norton
Those of you who follow me on Instagram may have already seen me talking about this book, but this one was certainly one of those "pleasantly surprised" moments for me. I picked up Holding purely because I had heard good things about it. Graham Norton's writing has received some great reviews so I was intrigued to know whether or not this was because he's famous and loved by many or if his writing was *actually* good. Reading the blurb of Holding, I decided I might enjoy the story. It centres around a small Irish village and the drama in the local community. A skeleton is uncovered when a new housing development is started in the village and the main character, PJ the Guard (the only policeman in the village - no that's not a euphemism), feels it's his chance to shine to solve who this skeleton once was.

I described this book when I was only a few chapters deep as being like a tamer version of Emmerdale but in an Irish village and I fully stand by that still now I've finished it. The story does follow PJ mostly, but it doesn't just look at him solving this old crime - it also explores his relationships, how he views himself and more. It also looks at the stories and lifestyles of a few of the villagers and how they're all interlinked. Some aspects of the book gripped me that were on the verge of going down a dark route, but Norton keeps his writing light so it never gets too dark in the story which I was a little disappointed in (but it's not that sort of book so I guess I'm asking for too much!). There's a twist towards the end of the story and I honestly saw it coming a mile off but despite it not shocking me, it didn't ruin the story and I finished reading the book feeling content. I was so pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed this book as I just didn't expect to like it as much as I did. Although it's not the most gripping story I've ever read and I prefer darker, more weird plots, this book is a good read, it's easy and simple to follow and if you're a fan of drama or soap operas, you will probably really love this. Grab your copy here.




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